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Simon Anderson
Founder,
Anderson Architecture / Australia
Simon_Anderson

Simon Anderson graduated from University of Technology Sydney in 1996. The part-time degree allowed him to work for a Sri Lankan trained architect, Pri De Fonseka, during his studies. Also pivotal during this period was a study tour of Mexico to learn about the work of Luis Baragan, a master of natural light, form and colour.

Following his architectural studies Simon worked for several firms in Sydney, most importantly Daryl Jackson Robin Dyke, Tony Caro Architecture and Kennedy Associates Architects (KAA), roles included design architect for Sydney Conservatorium, Verbrugghen Concert Hall and Hordern Pavilion. During his time with KAA, the passion for sustainable design was developed in projects such as the award-winning Clovelly House. In 2000 Simon was able to live in Stockholm, Sweden for close to a year, studying Scandinavian architecture.

The firm Anderson Architecture was formed by Simon in 2002 to explore domestic architecture with an emphasis on humane design and a priority on natural light and tactile materials, to bring projects to life. A connection with the natural and built environments is key to the firms thinking. The use of passive design ideas along with active systems to reduce a building energy use, a driving force. Computer thermal modelling to engage clients and give them feedback about heating, cooling, glazing and insulation is a key feedback loop in the design process.

Now employing six people the firm has been recognised with many awards for sustainable design and in judging sustainable resilient architecture.

andersonarchitecture.com.au

Finished in 2005 - Newtown House

The idea of organic folding forms emerged in an early project called the Newtown houses.

Finished in 2010 - Mosman House

Many early projects included thermally massive floors to trap winter sun and help cool the homes in summer.

Finished in 2012 - Waverley House - Exterior

This concept of folding roof form develops along with the idea that the roof could scoop light down into the house with the Waverley house. The roof form also reduces overshadowing their neighbour to the south. This was the first of our houses to include both passive and active thermal systems.

Thermal modelling along with double glazed thermal broken windows, high levels of insulated thermal mass are a few of the passive features. Computer controlled active features included automatic windows, shading and hydronic floor heating.

Finished in 2012 - Waverley House - Interior

This concept of folding roof form develops along with the idea that the roof could scoop light down into the house with the Waverley house. The roof form also reduces overshadowing their neighbour to the south. This was the first of our houses to include both passive and active thermal systems.

Thermal modelling along with double glazed thermal broken windows, high levels of insulated thermal mass are a few of the passive features. Computer controlled active features included automatic windows, shading and hydronic floor heating.

Finished in 2014 - Bridge House

Many of our houses occupy tight inner city sites such as the bridge house. The site narrows in the middle to 2.7m wide. To link the two ends of the house and allow light in, a "bridge" through a central courtyard was suspended over the kitchen below.

Finished in 2015 - Hanging Gardens House - Dining Room

Another challenging site resulted in a design that wrapped around a new atrium courtyard, whilst creating landscaped views over a green roof for the new first-floor study and bedroom.

Finished in 2015 - Hanging Gardens House - Kitchen

Another challenging site resulted in a design that wrapped around a new atrium courtyard, whilst creating landscaped views over a green roof for the new first-floor study and bedroom.

Finished in 2016 - Suntrap House

The Suntrap is centred around a new northern courtyard with various windows designed to draw direct sunlight into the heart of the home. Sustainability and environmental ethics were the key drivers behind the decision – making for The Suntrap. Initial thermal modelling of the pre‐existing south facing living area showed low comfort levels; however, through carefully placed windows facing thermal mass, awnings designed to maximise winter sun, and highly insulated composite wall and roof panels, the new homes living areas are now comfortable places to live.

Finished in 2017 - The Cube - Exterior

This home was designed for an environmentally minded family of 5, who had outgrown their house, however did not want to leave their historic cottage, park outlook or community garden so the existing home was renovated. Clad in sustainable Australian hardwood to tie in and complement the historic timber cottage at the front. The window seats have been designed around bringing the beautiful site trees and views of the park inside the house, and strategically placed windows allow dappled light through surrounding trees to enter throughout the entire day.

Finished in 2017 - The Cube - Kitchen

This home was designed for an environmentally minded family of 5, who had outgrown their house, however did not want to leave their historic cottage, park outlook or community garden so the existing home was renovated. Clad in sustainable Australian hardwood to tie in and complement the historic timber cottage at the front. The window seats have been designed around bringing the beautiful site trees and views of the park inside the house, and strategically placed windows allow dappled light through surrounding trees to enter throughout the entire day.